1914

1914 by Melina Druga

The story of two North American countries that found themselves embroiled in an European war – one by circumstance and one by choice. 

June 28, 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austrian-Hungarian Empire, and his wife Sophie are shot and killed by Slavic nationalist Gavrilo Princip in Sarajevo, Bosnia.  At first, the event is only of regional interest, but soon war clouds are enveloping Europe.

In Canada, the news is met with excitement and pride.  The nation commits 20,000 to 30,000 soldiers to Great Britain within two to three weeks, and there is a surplus of recruits.

Meanwhile, in the United States, the government is focused on isolationism and neutrality.  Capitalists and newspapers scheme about how Americans can profit from a war, and tourists refuse to change their plans.

Part one in the A Tale of Two Nations: Canada, U.S. and WW1 series.  The series explores journalism history by examining how newspapers reported on the war, painting a picture of the war as our ancestors knew it.

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