Author: Thomas Richardson

Thomas Richardson works for the National Archives and Records Administration. In graduate school, he taught U.S. history and world geography. He also worked on the World War II veterans’ oral history project at the Eisenhower Presidential Library. Thomas volunteers with the Midwestern History Association helping with their social media outreach as a contributing editor. He lives in St. Louis and spends much of his time with the Scottish St. Andrew Society. 
Hettie's World History United States World War One

World War One’s Native American Code Talkers

In World War II, a group of Navajo enlisted in the Marines with the sole purpose of developing unique communication codes. These Marines came to be known as the “code talkers,” soldiers who developed signals and messages based on native languages that when translated into English spelled out specific messages. The Navajo became famous for […]

Hettie's World History World War One

Sue for Armistice: Germany at the end of World War One

Europe experienced a level of death, carnage, and destruction unlike any war ever fought before. The Great War mounted millions of casualties, governments were overthrown, economies were crippled, and civilians were suffering nearly as much as the soldiers dying in the trenches.  By 1918 with the entry of the United States, Germany had begun seeing […]

Books & Publishing Fiction Hettie's World World War One

Erich Maria Remarque’s All Quiet on the Western Front

Historical events are captured, recorded, and interpreted in numerous ways. Primarily remembered in academic fields, history is emanated through popular culture as well. Films, TV shows, plays, books, and artwork tell the story behind some of history’s most significant events and people. For World War I, the preeminent example is arguably Erich Maria Remarque’s seminal […]

Hettie's World History United States World War One

The Committee on Public Information

President Woodrow Wilson struggled to maintain United States neutrality when war broke out in 1914. Strong social and political forces lobbied specific arguments supporting intervention or isolation. With the declaration of war in April 1917, Wilson understood that in order to maintain public support for the war, the U.S. government needed to create an agency […]

Hettie's World History United States World War One

World War I Led to Prohibition

The global impact of the Great War reverberated throughout world history. In the United States, the outbreak of the war brought about a significant event impacting every citizen. The conflict didn’t just influence how the United States recognized its place internationally, but how it behaved socially. It was in this wartime environment that the 18th […]

Hettie's World History United States World War One

America’s Preparedness Movement

European armies were larger than they had been even before the outbreak of World War I. Millions served on both sides and with them were the most technologically sophisticated and advanced military machinery of the day. More than 13 million men served in the German Army alone and were widely regarded as the most disciplined […]

Hettie's World History United States Women's history World War One

An Army of Housewives: The Women’s Committee during World War I

The home front directed factory production, agricultural output, and local community energies to the war effort in World War I. President Woodrow Wilson stated that “it is not only an army we must shape and train, but also a nation.” National sentiment leaned mostly to isolation, but by 1917, the U.S. became increasingly involved overseas, […]

Hettie's World History United States World War One

Sergeant York: The Conscientious Objector and Frontline Hero

The Meuse-Argonne was the scene of bloody fighting inflicted and sustained by the American Expeditionary Forces in France. Shining through the fighting were acts of bravery and sacrifice by those saving their comrades and leading troops against deadly odds. One of the most well-known of these heroes was Alvin Cullum York of Tennessee. During the […]

Hettie's World History United States World War One

Army General Staff College Played a Critical Role in the American Expeditionary Force

The U.S. Army faced a significant hurdle during their mobilization into the Great War: modern military technologies utilized by European armies were lacking in the U.S. Army and officers scantly adopted them. Training schools like Fort Leavenworth with the Cavalry School and School of the Line were a necessary component for officer education, but what […]

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