Category: History

Edwardian era History United States

Alaskans Celebrate July Fourth: This Week in History

Alaska was still a territory in 1913, but that didn’t stop it from having a fun-fill July Fourth, judging from the coverage in the Alaska Daily Empire in Juneau on July 5 and July 7. In the capital city, between 3,000 and 4,000 people gathered to watch a baseball game, and the area’s three ferries […]

History United States Victorian era

Prayers for Missionaries: This Week in History

Members of the congregations of three churches – one Baptist, one Presbyterian and one Methodist – gathered in Raleigh, North Carolina, to pray for missionaries, the Raleigh Times reported June 25, 1900.  The missionaries were serving in China and the Far East during the early days of the Boxer Rebellion. The service opened with a […]

Edwardian era History United States

Alexander Krieschwzi Goes to Trial for Murder: This Week in History

Seventeen-year-old Alexander Krieschwzi was on trial for the murder of his father, Lewis, the Evening Journal in Wilmington, Delaware, reported on June 9. 1908.  The teen was “a respectable-looking lad who did not appear to realize the seriousness of his position.” The elder Krieschwzi was murdered March 15, 1908, following an argument. According to the […]

Canada History Victorian era

Point Ellice Bridge Disaster: This Week in History

Many people celebrating Victoria Day “Plunged to Death,” the Victoria Daily Times said in a headline May 26, 1896.  A tram car carrying more than 100 people to witness a mock battle fell when the Point Ellice Bridge in Victoria, British Columbia collapsed. People were eager to attend the event and cars were leaving their […]

Edwardian era History United States

YMCA Campaign Raises $28,000: This Week in History

Among stories of crime and politics on the front page of the Colorado Springs Weekly Gazette on May 10, 1906, was a story of local interest.  A YMCA campaign had raised $28,000. Denver’s Simon Guggenheim made a generous $500 contribution to the organization’s Fifty Thousand Dollar Campaign, pushing it past the $28,000 mark. Other large […]

Canada Edwardian era History World War One

Canada’s Wartime Elections Act of 1917

Canada passed the Wartime Elections Act in September 1917.  The act was part of the Conservative government’s efforts to maintain power later that year during the federal election.  The act, however, was not without controversy. The act followed the nation’s conscription crisis that split the nation between those of English decent, who favored conscription, and […]

Canada Edwardian era History

Relatives Wait For the Dead From Titanic’s Sinking: This Week in History

“Halifax is waiting in funeral garb for the arrival of the cable ship Mackay-Bennett with its cargo of dead from the scene of the Titanic disaster,” the Montreal Gazette reported April 27, 1912.  “Hotels are crowded with the bereaved, and every train brings additional relatives of victims.” It was unknown when the “floating morgue” would […]

History Medicine

Rheumatic Fever: An Ailment From a Bygone Era

Rheumatic fever is not a disease you hear much about in the 21st century.  It is a disease, however, that plays a minor role in my WW1 Trilogy as Hettie Bartlette’s father, Benjamin, suffers from the ailment. What is rheumatic fever?  It is a complication that can result from streptococcal infections such as strep throat.  It […]

History United States Victorian era

California Columbian Club Prepares for the 1893 World’s Fair: This Week in History

California possibly would be the best represented state at the World’s Fair in Chicago, the Los Angeles Times declared April 9, 1893. The state’s building would be the largest structure on the fairgrounds that wasn’t built specifically for the exposition and was, in the opinion of the Times, “the most beautiful and attractive edifice within […]

Canada History Victorian era

Fathers of Confederation: Canada’s Humble Beginnings

The United States has the Founding Fathers.  Canada has the Fathers of Confederation.  Unlike the Founding Fathers, whose new nation gained independence thanks to war, the Fathers of Confederation took a quieter, more methodical approach. Fathers of Confederation refers to 36 men who represented their colonies at one or more conferences that were held to […]

Edwardian era History United States

Will Jim Crow Survive?: This Week in History

“‘Shall Jim Crow Prevail?’ The Burning Question,” an AP story in the Dallas Express asked March 29, 1919.  The question followed the bombing of two buildings in Southside Chicago. In 1896, the Supreme Court decision Plessy vs. Ferguson made separate-but-equal legal.  The question on the minds of many that March was whether the institution would […]

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