Category: Canada

Canada History Victorian era

Point Ellice Bridge Disaster: This Week in History

Many people celebrating Victoria Day “Plunged to Death,” the Victoria Daily Times said in a headline May 26, 1896.  A tram car carrying more than 100 people to witness a mock battle fell when the Point Ellice Bridge in Victoria, British Columbia collapsed. People were eager to attend the event and cars were leaving their […]

Canada Edwardian era History World War One

Canada’s Wartime Elections Act of 1917

Canada passed the Wartime Elections Act in September 1917.  The act was part of the Conservative government’s efforts to maintain power later that year during the federal election.  The act, however, was not without controversy. The act followed the nation’s conscription crisis that split the nation between those of English decent, who favored conscription, and […]

Canada Edwardian era History

Relatives Wait For the Dead From Titanic’s Sinking: This Week in History

“Halifax is waiting in funeral garb for the arrival of the cable ship Mackay-Bennett with its cargo of dead from the scene of the Titanic disaster,” the Montreal Gazette reported April 27, 1912.  “Hotels are crowded with the bereaved, and every train brings additional relatives of victims.” It was unknown when the “floating morgue” would […]

Canada History Victorian era

Fathers of Confederation: Canada’s Humble Beginnings

The United States has the Founding Fathers.  Canada has the Fathers of Confederation.  Unlike the Founding Fathers, whose new nation gained independence thanks to war, the Fathers of Confederation took a quieter, more methodical approach. Fathers of Confederation refers to 36 men who represented their colonies at one or more conferences that were held to […]

Canada History Victorian era

What is Victoria Day and Why Do Canadians Celebrate It?

In my novel, Angel of Mercy, Hettie’s birthday and her marriage to Geoffrey Bartlette correspond with the celebration of Victoria Day.  If you’re American, you may be unaware of this holiday or why Canadians celebrate it. The holiday commemorates the birthday of Queen Victoria who was born May 24, 1819.  It did not become a […]

Canada Edwardian era History

Henri Bourassa: Early 20th Century Political Influencer

Any discussion of Canada during the early 20th century would not be complete without including Henri Bourassa. Bourassa was outspoken and not afraid to fight for his beliefs. Bourassa was born in Quebec in 1868, a little more than a year after the formation of Canada.  He entered politics in his early 20s and was […]

Canada Edwardian era History

Sir Robert Borden: Canada’s Wartime Prime Minister

Robert Borden is the prime minister who led Canada through the contentious years of World War I.  An attorney by trade, he entered politics in 1896 and quickly rose to leader of the Conservative Party. Borden became prime minister following the nasty 1911 federal election that split the nation between those who were for and […]

Canada Edwardian era History Victorian era

Sir Wilfred Laurier: Canada’s First Modern Prime Minister

Hettie Bartlette, the main character in my novel Angel of Mercy, was born in Ontario in 1892.  Despite being 27 at the end of the third novel in the series, Adjustment Year (estimated publication date 2021), she has memories of only two prime ministers.  The longer serving of which was Sir Wilfrid Laurier. Laurier was […]

Canada Edwardian era History United States

Forgotten Murders From the 1910s

My latest nonfiction book, Heinous: Forgotten Murders From the 1910s, was inspired by news stories I discovered while researching A Tale of Two Nations.  As I conducted my research, I discovered case after case of murder, suicide, murder-suicide, lynchings, cop killings, doctors and nurses poisoning patients, and fatal traffic accidents.  It became clear that crime […]

Books & Publishing Canada History Nonfiction United States World War One

5 Things I Learned While Writing A Tale of Two Nations

If you’ve been studying a subject for as long as I have, you might not think there is anything left to discover or surprise. I’ve been studying World War I and how it changed the lives of ordinary people since I was a teenager. When I embarked on writing A Tale of Two Nations, my […]

Canada History Medicine World War One

The Tale of HMHS Llandovery Castle

Noncombatant servicemen and women are not free from danger.  Such was the case of the medical corps during World War One. Medical units were located close enough to the front to see and hear bombardments. Sometimes camps were bombed — either accidentally or on purpose — ambulances hit land mines, and hospital ships were sunk. One […]

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