Category: Women’s history

History Journalism Medicine Victorian era Women's history

Blackwell’s Island Asylum: “What, excepting torture, would produce insanity quicker than this treatment?”

This post was written by a guest blogger.  If you would like to guest blog, please fill out this form. Elizabeth Cochran’s Heroic Actions to Expose Corruption at Blackwell’s Island Women’s Asylum By Paulette Mahurin The Blackwell’s Island Asylum was the first civic mental hospital in the city of New York. Starting in the early […]

Edwardian era History Victorian era Women's history

The History of the Corset: A Slave to Fashion

The corset is probably considered the most uncomfortable garment ever invented, not only because it constricts the body, but because it also is symbolic of women being constricted in society.  Was this true, or is it a stereotype? Corsets have been part of a woman’s wardrobe since antiquity.  Over the centuries, they evolved and changed. […]

Edwardian era History Women's history

Lizzy Murphy: The First Woman to Play Major League Baseball

Her name is lost in history for all but the most ardent baseball fans.  Mary Elizabeth “Lizzy” Murphy, the Queen of Baseball, was the first woman to play for a major league baseball team. Born in 1894 in Rhode Island, Murphy had sports in her blood.  Her father was a semi-professional baseball player.  As a […]

History Victorian era Women's history

Josephine Cochran: History of the Dishwasher

Most of us rarely stop to think about the history of mundane things, such as our household items and appliances.  The dishwasher didn’t become commonplace in homes until the latter part of the 20th century.  However, the dishwasher has a history dating back more than 150 years.  What’s more, unlike many objects in your home, […]

History United States Women's history World War One

An Army of Housewives: The Women’s Committee during World War I

The following post was written by a guest blogger.  If you would like to contribute a guest blog post, read the guidelines. An Army of Housewives: The Women’s Committee during World War I By Thomas Richardson The home front directed factory production, agricultural output, and local community energies to the war effort in World War […]

History Women's history World War One

Violet Jessop: The Unsinkable Nurse Who Survived Two Downed Ships

Violet Jessop was born October 2, 1888, in Argentina.  Born to Irish parents, Jessop had several siblings. Her family moved to Britain after her father’s death. Jessop followed in her mother’s footsteps and began working as an ocean liner stewardess. She was on the Olympic when it collided with another ship in 1911. The following […]

History Women's history World War One

Gabrielle Petit: Belgian Symbol of Martyrdom and Wartime Resistance

Gabrielle Petit was born February 20, 1893, in Tournai, Belgium. Born into a working class family, Petit had a difficult childhood. She worked several jobs and had no permanent residence until she was taken in by a benefactor. World War One When war broke out, Petit volunteered for the Belgian Red Cross. Later that year, […]

Edwardian era History Journalism Medicine Victorian era Women's history

Victorian Insane Asylums: Treating Disease with Torture

Institutions to house the mentally ill began in the Middle Ages. The word “bedlam” is derived from the 760-year-old Bethlem Royal Hospital, which is still in operation. In the 21st century, unfortunately, there is a stigma about mental illness. One hundred years ago, however, being mentally ill meant more than being judged and stereotyped.  It […]

Books & Publishing Fiction History Women's history World War One Writing & Editing

Mary Borden: Supplying and Paying for a Mobile Hospital

Mary Borden, the daughter of a Chicago millionaire, was born May 15,1886.  She left home as soon as she was of age and traveled to India where she married a Scottish missionary and had two daughters. In 1913, she moved to London and began associating with writers and poets. A third daughter was born a […]

Books & Publishing History Nonfiction Women's history World War One Writing & Editing

Vera Brittain: World War One Cost Her Every Man She Loved

Vera Brittain was born December 29, 1893 in Newcastle-under-Lyme, England. She is best known for her 1933 memoir Testament to Youth which talks about her wartime experiences.  Brittain also was a pacifist who wrote poetry and 28 other books. Brittain was born into a wealthy family that moved twice during her childhood. Her brother Edward was her […]

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