Category: Women’s history

Edwardian era Hettie's World History Lucretia's World Victorian era Women's history

The History of the Corset: A Slave to Fashion

The corset is probably considered the most uncomfortable garment ever invented, not only because it constricts the body, but also because it is symbolic of women being constricted in society.  Was this true, or is it a stereotype? Corsets have been part of a woman’s wardrobe since antiquity.  Over the centuries, they evolved and changed. The […]

Edwardian era Hettie's World History Women's history

Lizzy Murphy: The First Woman to Play Major League Baseball

Her name is lost in history to all but the most ardent baseball fans.  Mary Elizabeth “Lizzy” Murphy, the Queen of Baseball, was the first woman to play for a major league baseball team. Born in 1894 in Rhode Island, Murphy had sports in her blood.  Her father was a semi-professional baseball player.  As a […]

History Lucretia's World Rose's World Victorian era Women's history

Josephine Cochran: History of the Dishwasher

Most of us rarely stop to think about the history of mundane things, such as our household items and appliances.  The dishwasher didn’t become commonplace in homes until the latter part of the 20th century.  However, the dishwasher has a history dating back more than 150 years.  What’s more, unlike many objects in your home, […]

Hettie's World History United States Women's history World War One

An Army of Housewives: The Women’s Committee during World War I

The home front directed factory production, agricultural output, and local community energies to the war effort in World War I. President Woodrow Wilson stated that “it is not only an army we must shape and train, but also a nation.” National sentiment leaned mostly to isolation, but by 1917, the U.S. became increasingly involved overseas, […]

Hettie's World History Women's history World War One

Violet Jessop: The Unsinkable Nurse Who Survived Two Downed Ships

Violet Jessop was born October 2, 1888, in Argentina.  Born to Irish parents, Jessop had several siblings. Her family moved to Britain after her father’s death. Jessop followed in her mother’s footsteps and began working as an ocean liner stewardess. She was on the Olympic when it collided with another ship in 1911. The following […]

Hettie's World History Women's history World War One

Gabrielle Petit: Belgian Symbol of Martyrdom and Wartime Resistance

Gabrielle Petit was born February 20, 1893, in Tournai, Belgium. Born into a working class family, Petit had a difficult childhood. She worked several jobs and had no permanent residence until she was taken in by a benefactor. World War I When war broke out, Petit volunteered for the Belgian Red Cross. Later that year, […]

Edwardian era Hettie's World History Journalism Lucretia's World Medicine Rose's World Victorian era Women's history

Victorian Insane Asylums: Treating Disease with Torture

Institutions to house the mentally ill began in the Middle Ages. The word “bedlam” is derived from the nearly 800-year-old Bethlem Royal Hospital, which is still in operation. In the 21st century, unfortunately, there is a stigma about mental illness. One hundred years ago, however, being mentally ill meant more than being judged and stereotyped.  […]

Books & Publishing Fiction Hettie's World History Women's history World War One Writing & Editing

Mary Borden: Supplying and Paying for a Mobile Hospital

Mary Borden, the daughter of a Chicago millionaire, was born May 15,1886.  She left home as soon as she was of age and traveled to India where she married a Scottish missionary and had two daughters. In 1913, she moved to London and began associating with writers and poets. A third daughter was born a […]

Books & Publishing Hettie's World History Nonfiction Women's history World War One Writing & Editing

Vera Brittain: World War One Cost Her Every Man She Loved

Vera Brittain was born December 29, 1893, in Newcastle-under-Lyme, England. She is best known for her 1933 memoir Testament to Youth which talks about her wartime experiences.  Brittain also was a pacifist who wrote poetry and 28 other books. Brittain was born into a wealthy family that moved twice during her childhood. Her brother Edward was […]

Edwardian era Hettie's World History Lucretia's World Victorian era Women's history

The Age of the New Woman: Her Time Has Come and Gone. Or Has It?

Around the turn of the 20th century, a curious, new creature emerged in the world. This creature was called “the new woman” or an “independently minded female.” She was the sign of things to come, a woman who relied on herself, not a man. Who Was the New Woman? The term “new woman” was coined […]

Hettie's World History Lucretia's World Victorian era Women's history

The Iconic Gibson Girl: The Feminine Ideal of the 1890s

Even if you don’t know much about the history of advertising, you’ve probably heard of the Gibson Girl.  She represented the feminine ideal of the 1890s and was the first media image of an ideal woman, establishing society’s preference for an hourglass figure and portraying the image of the girl next door. Illustrator Charles Dana Gibson developed […]

Claire's World Edwardian era Hettie's World History Lucretia's World Rose's World Victorian era Women's history

Women and Friendship Over Time: How Female Friendship Has Always Been Difficult

Today, women’s friendships are a big deal. There are websites dedicated to helping friends meet, books have been written on the subject, and blogs are filled with helpful how-tos. They all say women need friendships in their lives, but that it’s hard in our modern, busy society for people to meet. They also point out […]

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