Tag: journalism

Edwardian era History Journalism Victorian era Writing & Editing

Journalism at the Turn of the 20th Century

Today news can be accessed at the touch of a button, and it’s sometimes difficult to imagine an age when the newspaper was king. But that’s exactly how it was in the late 19th century. Several newspaper editions were usually published daily, and most communities of any size had multiple papers competing against each other. […]

Edwardian era History Journalism Medicine Victorian era Women's history

Victorian Insane Asylums: Treating Disease with Torture

Institutions to house the mentally ill began in the Middle Ages. The word “bedlam” is derived from the 760-year-old Bethlem Royal Hospital, which is still in operation. In the 21st century, unfortunately, there is a stigma about mental illness. One hundred years ago, however, being mentally ill meant more than being judged and stereotyped.  It […]

Canada History World War One Writing & Editing

Extra, Extra, Read All About It: Trench Newspapers

Don’t believe what you see in the movies.  Soldiers during World War One were not constantly at the front.  Between battles, they experienced periods of painful boredom.  To keep themselves entertained, they put on plays and published trench newspapers, among other things. These activities kept soldiers occupied and no doubt kept them from sinking into […]

Books & Publishing History Journalism Nonfiction United States Victorian era

How the Other Half Lives

Once upon a time in America, a large number of people lived in abject poverty, out of sight and out of mind. Photojournalist Jacob Riis’s 1890 book How the Other Half Lives: Studies among the Tenements of New York revealed this hidden community to the affluent and middle class. His book was an expose on tenement living, […]

Books & Publishing Edwardian era History Nonfiction United States

Welcome to the Jungle

The Jungle might very well be the most influential novel you probably don’t know. Written by Upton Sinclair in 1906, the novel was intended to show the horrible conditions in America’s slums. Instead, Sinclair exposed the unsanitary conditions in meatpacking plants. The novel first appeared as a serial (a common occurrence for novels in the 19th-century) in […]

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