The Causes of World War I: Part 3 – Militarism

Soldiers stand around and on a supersized gun

The Causes of World War I: Part 3 – Militarism

Militarism is defined as maintaining a large military and being prepared to use it to defend a nation’s interests.

In the early 20th century, this arms race led to disaster.

Industrial Output

The years prior to the war saw a surge in industrialization. Manufacturing output grew, buildings were electrified, municipal water works were constructed, and railroad networks crossed Europe.

New inventions and scientific discoveries increased the human lifespan and led to a population explosion starting in the last quarter of the 19th century. In 1900, a quarter of the world’s 1.6 billion people lived in Europe. This population contributed to both the workforce and the military.

Along with discoveries that improved lives came inventions that took them.

Killing machines that were invented or perfected from 1875 to 1920 include:

  • Machine guns
  • Artillery guns
  • Airplanes
  • Dreadnoughts, the first modern warship
  • Submarines
  • High explosives
  • Smokeless propellants replace gunpowder
  • Rapid fire rifles
  • Tanks

Building an Arsenal

By August 1914, the major European powers had been preparing for war for years. Nations competed to see which could build the largest navy. New military technologies also meant armies had to be reequipped.

Conscription went into effect in many nations, requiring men to spend a compulsory amount of time in military service.

When the war began, nations were convinced it would end quickly. Kaiser Wilhelm, for example, promised his troops they would be home before the autumn leaves changed color.

Instagram
Twitter
Amazon
Youtube
Goodreads
LinkedIn
Pinterest

Enjoy history and historical fiction?  Join the mailing list and stay up-to-date on book releases, news, beta reading opportunities and more.

Updated: 23 October 2020
Melina Druga
Most kids have an active imagination. My imagination has stayed strong into adulthood, and I’ve funneled that creativity into a successful writing career. I write history, both fiction and nonfiction, because although your school history classes may have been boring, the past is not. My goal is to bring the past to life in all its myriad of colors.
Back To Top